Vermicomposting

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Vermi what?!

I had no idea either, but when the RMWB began to offer worm composting kits to schools, we knew we had to jump on board. Our EEP and grade 4 classes each got their own bins and we are really enjoying the process so far. The worms LOVE watermelon and apples (which is great because we are an APPLE school; lots of cores to compost!).

With the help of the A Plus for Energy Grant, we are hoping to have vermicomposting in every classroom that wants it at our school in September. We will also be exploring the use of Bokashi compost systems, which use bacteria instead of worms. It will be interesting to contrast the two types of composting and see which is more effective!

June 18th, we found a huge clump of worms hiding underneath a decomposing apple core! It was interesting to hold them and feel them squirm in our hands.

June 18th 2014, we found a huge clump of worms hiding underneath a decomposing apple core! It was interesting to hold them and feel them squirm in our hands.

The EEP students were finding it hard to see the worms, so we found a tray to put them on. We had to make sure we didn't leave any tiny, transparent baby worms on the tray when we were done!

The EEP students were finding it hard to see the worms, so we found a tray to put them on. We had to make sure we didn’t leave any tiny, transparent baby worms on the tray when we were done!

June 2 2014. An EEPer put her apple core in the bin last week. This week we found worms all over it!

June 2nd 2014. An EEPer put her apple core in the bin last week. This week we found worms all over it!

It is important to turn the soil so we can make sure it is not too wet or too dry. It also helps keep mold and flies away if the food is buried.

It is important to turn the soil so we can make sure it is not too wet or too dry. It also helps keep mold and flies away if the food is buried.

Worms need paper to help the decomposing process. We used left over book orders. The EEPers cut them into smaller pieces, dunked them in water and squeezed it out, then added it to the worm bin.

Worms need paper to help the decomposing process. We used left over book orders. The EEPers cut them into smaller pieces, dunked them in water and squeezed it out, then added it to the worm bin.

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